Dior And The New Look

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If  you know anything about fashion history, you will know that 1947 was a major date in fashion history. It ushered what was called “The New Look” and was brought to the world courtesy of the late Christian Dior. Until this day, the house of Dior still harkens back to its very beginnings year after year.

But while ” The New Look” today looks delightfully refined and retro, but believe it or not it was very shocking to people when it was introduced. It wasn’t the tightly corseting, the padding,  or ultra feminine tailoring, that actually harkened to the Victorian era that was all quite fine…what shocked people was the long hemlines.

For people today, its usually the short hemlines that are those to offend, not the long modest length, so why did it offend so many in 1947?

The long hem mid-calf hemline ( called a midi today), required a lot of fabric, something that had been in short supply during the war. People had tried their hardest to “make to and mend.” Women were taught the less fabric used. When ” The New Look” was introduced, it was introduced war-torn Europe who two years early had been in the throes of one of bloodiest wars in history.

The last thing they wanted to see was what they deemed as “excess” which is exactly what they thought of it.

Though ” The New Look” had a bumpy start, it soon became the springboard from which fashions of the 1950s were based around. Today, the revolutionary look is still emulated by Dior and other designers.

For my outfit, I choose to emulate the 1947 look but with a bit of a nod to Dior’s 21st century Haute Couture looks as well and mix modern with vintage.

The hat is from the late 1940s or early 1950s.  It is a classic new look shape sculpted out of feathers. The skirt is modern made by my clothing line. The jacket is John Galliano ( a long time designer for Dior) and the shoes are 1940s.

 

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